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Home  /   Type of Disaster /   Landslide
 

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Safety tips on flash floods and landslides
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Flash floods

 Heavy rainfall over a short period of time results in flash floods, landslides and urban flooding in some parts of the state. It is because the speed and quantity of inflow of water out pace out drainage systems. Very heavy rainfall in hill tops results in sudden down flow of water at a high speed and may create havoc in habitations down below the hillock. Sometimes, this high speed water evades the traditional path and carries with it Mudflows, Earth flows, debris flows and Rock falls. Such flows and floods hardly give any time for preparation.Flash floods inundate areas suddenly and remain for a short period of time. Yet its damaging potential is as high as that of the general floods. The most unpredictable aspect of this is that flash floods hardly give any time for preparation. Advance planning and response through trigger mechanism is the best way to tackle the situations arising out of flash floods. Administration requires being fully alert and communities totally prepared in advance for the situation. 
Safety tips for general floods and landslides hold good for flash floods as well.
 
Landslides
Outward and downward movement of mass, consisting of rock and soils, due to natural or man-made causes is termed as landslide. High intensity rainfall triggers most of the landslides. The Landslides and related phenomena such as Mudflows, Earth flows, Rock falls, Debris flows are natural events that would occur without human activity, however human use and interest has led to increase in the intensity of these events.
 
Preparing for a landslide
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Develop a Family Disaster Plan. Develop landslide-specific planning. Learn about landslide risk in your area. Contact local officials, state geological surveys or departments of natural resources, and university departments of geology. Landslides occur where they have before, and in identifiable hazard locations. Ask for information uest a professional referral for a very detailed site analysis of your property, and corrective measures you can take, if necessary

 
If you are at risk from landslides:
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Develop an evacuation plan. You should know where to go if you have to leave. Trying to make plans at the last minute can be upsetting and create confusion.

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Discuss landslides and debris flow with your family. Everyone should know what to do in case, all family members are not together. Discussing disaster ahead of time helps reduce fear and lets everyone know how to respond during a landslide or debris flow.

 
What to Do Before Intense Storms
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Become familiar with the land around you. Learn whether landslides and debris flows have occurred in your area by contacting local officials, state geological surveys or departments of natural resources, and university departments of geology. Knowing the land can help you assess your risk for danger.

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Watch the patterns of storm-water drainage on slopes near your home, and especially the places where runoff water converges, increasing flow over soil-covered slopes. Watch the hillsides around your home for any signs of land movement, such as small landslides or debris flows, or progressively tilting trees. Watching small changes could alert you to the potential of a greater landslide threat.

 
What to Do During Intense Storms

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Stay alert and awake. Many debris-flow fatalities occur when people are sleeping. Listen to Weather bulletins of Radio and television for warnings of intense rainfall. Be aware that intense, short bursts of rain may be particularly dangerous, especially after longer periods of heavy rainfall and damp weather.

 
If you are in areas susceptible to landslides and debris flows,-
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Consider leaving if it is safe to do so. Remember that driving during an intense storm can be hazardous. If you remain at home, move to a second story if possible. Staying out of the path of a landslide or debris flow saves lives.

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Listen for any unusual sounds that might indicate moving debris, such as trees cracking or boulders knocking together. A trickle of flowing or falling mud or debris may precede larger landslides. Moving debris can flow quickly and sometimes without warning.

 
If you are near a stream or channel,
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Be alert for any sudden increase or decrease in water flow and for a change from clear to muddy water. Such changes may indicate landslide activity upstream, so be prepared to move quickly. Dont delay! Save yourself, not your belongings.

 
Be especially alert when driving.
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Embankments along roadsides are particularly susceptible to landslides. Watch the road for collapsed pavement, mud, fallen rocks, and other indications of possible debris flows. Do not drive on a cause away even though the water flow over this seems to be very negligible.

 
What to Do if You Suspect Imminent Landslide Danger
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Contact your local fire, police, public works department or district administration. Local officials are the best persons able to assess potential danger.

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Inform affected neighbors. Your neighbors may not be aware of potential hazards. Advising them of a potential threat may help save lives. Help neighbors who may need assistance to evacuate.

» Evacuate. Getting out of the path of a landslide or debris flow is your best protection.
 
What to Do During a Landslide
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Stay away from the slide area. There may be danger of additional slides.

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Check for injured and trapped persons near the slide, without entering the direct slide area, direct rescuers to their locations.

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Help a neighbor who may require special assistance--infants, elderly people, and people with disabilities. Elderly people and people with disabilities may require additional assistance. People who care for them or who have large families may need additional assistance in emergency situations

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Listen to local radio or television stations for the latest emergency information.

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Watch for flooding, which may occur after a landslide or debris flow. Floods sometimes follow landslides and debris flows because they may both be started by the same event.

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Look for and report broken utility lines to appropriate authorities. Reporting potential hazards will get the utilities turned off as quickly as possible, preventing further hazard and injury.

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Check the building foundation, chimney, and surrounding land for damage. Damage to foundations, chimneys, or surrounding land may help you assess the safety of the area.

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Replant damaged ground as soon as possible since erosion caused by loss of ground cover can lead to flash flooding.

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Seek the advice of a geotechnical expert for evaluating landslide hazards or designing corrective techniques to reduce landslide risk. A professional will be able to advise you of the best ways to prevent or reduce landslide risk, without creating further hazard.

 
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